Living With Diabetes

According to the CDC (Center for Disease Control), there are over 29 million people in the United States that have diabetes and of those, 8.1 million are undiagnosed. Being diagnosed is the first step to better health and being able to live a fuller and longer life.

According to the CDC (Center for Disease Control), there are over 29 million people in the United States that have diabetes and of those, 8.1 million are undiagnosed. Being diagnosed is the first step to better health and being able to live a fuller and longer life.

Most people will feel overwhelmed after being diagnosed, but you do not need to despair. With proper medical care and advice, your doctor will be able to help you create a treatment plan that is right for you. 

You are probably thinking, What does this all mean? To begin, you must know if you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes:

Type 1 diabetes effects only 5% of people with diabetes and this is usually children and young adults. With Type 1 diabetes your pancreas is no longer producing insulin. Insulin is a hormone that our bodies produce and is needed to get glucose(sugar) from our bloodstream and into the cells of our bodies. Our bodies need to break down starches and sugars that we eat into glucose. Glucose is then used for our energy.

 You will have to monitor your blood glucose levels daily and administer insulin. Insulin can be administered with insulin pens or by an insulin pump. If your child was recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes the American Diabetes Association has a Free Kit for children and their families called Our Courage-Wisdom Hope Kit that you can order. 

Type 2 diabetes: This is the most common type of diabetes. With type 2 your body does not use insulin properly. Your pancreas will make extra insulin to compensate the shortage but eventually it will not be able to keep up your blood glucose to normal levels. This is called insulin resistance. 

With proper medical care and lifestyle changes, you can prevent the onset of complications. By working with your doctor you will learn how to test your blood glucose and learn to make the necessary diet and exercise changes needed to stay healthy.

Learn the ABC's of diabetes: A1C, Blood Pressure  and Cholesterol

A - A1C Test-This shows what your blood glucose has been over the last three months. The goal for most people is to be below 7. 

B- Blood Pressure- People with diabetes should aim for a blood pressure goal below 140/90. Always check with your Doctor for what your goal should be. 

C- Choles​terol- Your doctor will help determine what your HDL (Good cholesterol) and LDL (bad cholesterol) should be. 

Get Yearly Check-Ups-Make sure you get tested yearly for the following if you are diabetic:

  • Dental Exam to check your teeth and gums. Make sure that your dentist is informed that you have diabetes.
  • Complete foot exam- You need to take special care of your feet with diabetes. There are special shoes and socks for diabetics.           The shoes are sometimes called sugar shoes. They have extra padding and have alot of width in them to help with circulation.           Diabetic socks are seamless to help prevent cuts and scrapes on your feet.
  • Flu shot- a yearly flu shot will help maintain your health
  • Urine and Blood Test to check for kidney problems.
  • Cholesterol Test
  • Triglyceride Test​
  • Dilated Eye Exam ​